Conserving Natural
Resources

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Our roots run deep when it comes to conservation. Farmers and timber growers conserve land, air and water — all day. Every day. 

Farmers and forest landowners participate in voluntary conservation programs, which preserve green spaces (grasslands, forests and wetlands) that absorb greenhouse gases and filter our state’s abundant water resources. 

Alabama’s 23 million acres of timberland produce enough oxygen for 214 million people to breath every year. Keep in mind: Alabama has just over 5 million citizens.

About 60% percent of Alabama’s surface water flows through privately owned forests. 

Forest landowners protect, maintain and improve water quality through forestry Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs ensure equipment used when harvesting timber doesn’t push sediment or brush into nearby waterways or erode stream banks. BMPs include correctly planning and constructing forest roads, log landings, stream buffers and stream crossings.

Forests also provide wildlife habitat. Alabama is the fifth most biologically diverse state in the U.S. in terms of overall species richness, particularly aquatic species. 

Farmers are required to follow Nutrient Management Plans when fertilizing crops and managing animal manure. These plans specify how much fertilizer, manure or other nutrient sources may be applied to crops to achieve yields while preventing excess nutrients from impacting waterways.

Chicken farmers minimize water runoff and emissions by planting vegetative buffers between chicken houses, which help absorb water, dust and other emissions.

Additional Resources:

· Hay Fever: Couple Finds Greener Grass Of Urban Sprawl Alabama Farmers Federation, June 2022

· Farmers Lead On Litter Control Alabama Farmers Federation, June 2022